Spiritual Architecture: Ma Yangson

Spiritual Architecture: Ma Yangson

Ma Yansong’s philosophic approach to architecture is an inspiration no matter what field of creativity you belongs to. In the way he chooses instinct over rationality, values emotions over logic and seeks a spiritual connection with the natural world, Yansong creates structures and spaces that evoke powerful and intimate visceral responses.

Picture from China Woods

Picture from China Woods

Picture from Architize

Picture from Architize

Among his most notable works are the curvaceous and twisted Absolute Towers in Mississauga, Canada, the icicle inspired China Wood Sculpture Museum in Harbin, northeast China, and the Fake Hills, an undulating new landmark in Beihai, China.

In a recent interview in Fast Co. (read more on www.fastcodesign.com)  , Yansong cites that modern architecture has become a symbol of power and capital, rather than a celebration of nature and humanity. The modern approach is too focused on getting the “right” answer. The result is sameness that lacks emotion and imagination. “If a designer doesn’t put emotion into the project at the beginning, how can a project have a spirit? And how will people feel about it in the future?”

We couldn’t agree more.

Designing without emotion is an empty exercise that will fail to move people or make a lasting impact. The spirit of a great design starts at the very beginning by allowing the instinct to have a voice and letting the imagination play.

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Marketing the Real Thing

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